wtf

Podcasts in iTunes packen – Fick dich Apple! Und Google, du dich auch.

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017 | Insights, Linux, Misc, Tech-savvy | No Comments

Ausgangslage: Ich mache Podcasts. Ich arbeite mit Linux. Ich möchte gerne in das iTunes Podcast Verzeichnis. (Eigentlich will ich ja nix außer meinen RSS Feed in ein Verzeichnis pushen…)

Kollege: “Um bei iTunes deinen Podcast ins Verzeichnis zu bringen brauchst du kein iTunes auf deinem Rechner, nur ‘ne Apple-ID.” (Source)

Na gut, prima, ich lege also eine Apple ID an (im Web) und versuche es.
https://podcastsconnect.apple.com/

Ich werde mit einer Fehlermeldung abgewatscht:
“Podcasts Connect erfordert einen iTunes Store-Account.”
Darunter ein Link: Zum iTunes Store

Ich klicke auf den Link, der schlicht auf itunes.apple.com verweist und kann mich – oh Wunder – mit meiner Apple ID dort anmelden. WTF? Also habe ich doch einen iTunes Store-Account?! Apple, ich bin verwirrt.

Ich google also die Fehlermeldung. Dort lese ich, dass man sich in iTunes und nich auf der iTunes Seite anmelden muss. Geil, wie dass die Fehlermeldung “Podcasts Connect erfordert einen iTunes Store-Account.” offenbart.

In iTunes soll man sich anmelden und dann dort ein zwei Informationen zu seinem Account hinterlegen. Nun gut.

Meine Nerven liegen also bereits leicht blank als ich zu einem Kollegen mit Mac gehe und mich in iTunes anmelde. Super. Der Wizard zur Anmeldung will dann direkt eine Zahlungsmethode von mir. Es gibt keine direkte Möglichkeit das zu umgehen. WTF again?! Ich fühle mich ins Jahr 2009 zurück versetzt, als ich schlicht einen iPod Touch in Betrieb nehmen wollte, was, ohne Kreditkarte, nicht möglich war. Dürfen Menschen ohne Kreditkarte keine iPod nutzen?

Fick dich Apple! Mir geht deine Philosophie in vielen Bereichen so gegen den Strich, dass ich im Strahl kotzen könnte. Ich mag keinen Zwang, vor allem nicht, wenn jemand meine Kreditkarteninformationen haben will. Dann spiele ich halt wieder mit den Open Source Schmuddelkindern. Da fühl ich mich sowieso wohler. Und sag nicht ich würde es nicht alle Jubeljahre mit dir versuchen, aber wir zwei passen anscheinend einfach nicht zusammen.

Wer jetzt meint, dass ich selber schuld bin und dass das bei Apple halt so ist: ich habe vor einiger Zeit einen YouTube Kanal aufgemacht (icanplaystayshun), einfach mal so zum Spaß. Mit einem Google Konto. Schnell, kostenlos, unkompliziert.

Hat Google ein Podcast Verzeichnis? Scheiße! Wieso bin ich da nicht vorher drauf gekommen!? Das guck ich mir mal an!

Edit 1: 30.08.2017

https://support.google.com/googleplay/podcasts/answer/6260341

“Podcasts are not available in your country
Podcasts are coming soon to Google Play Music, but unfortunately, they’re not yet available in your country.”

Und Google Play Music kann man auch in der kostenlosen Variante nicht ohne Zahlungsinformaitonen nutzen.
“Our music deals require that you have a form of payment on file to confirm your country of residence as music rights vary by country”

Also auch nicht besser. Schade. Wenigstens geben die einen “guten Grund” an. Auch wenn mein freier Podcast mal nix mit “music rights in my country” zu tun hat. Hallo? Podcast! Selbst produziert! Ich will doch nur ins Verzeichnis! 🙂

Edit 2: 30.08.2017

Werde mir jetzt noch Stitcher ansehen. Dann habe ich aber die Schnauze voll 😀

So, das scheint geklappt zu haben. Die wollten auch recht viele Infos (Adresse) und die Terms und Conditions haben es auch in sich. Garagen Sprech ist nun dort in der Approval Phase und Dennis tötet mich beim nächsten Cast weil ich wieder in Anglizismen versinke.

Was ein Kack, nur um mal so ‘nen RSS Feed publik zu machen…

Edit 3: 31.08.2017

Wir sind online! 😀 Stitcher hat den RSS Feed nun in sein Directory aufgenommen.

Findbar über:
✔ copy/paste des RSS Feeds in deine App 😉
Stitcher (natürlich)
Podcast Addict (Android)
– Podcast.app (iOS)
– Overcast (iOS)
– iTunes
– Spotify

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Samsung Galaxy 5 aka Europa aka 550 aka GT-I5500

Saturday, January 29th, 2011 | Gadgets, Reviews, Tech-savvy | No Comments

Apart from the inscrutable naming scheme this is a pretty nice entry level smartphone. You may remember me ranting about smartphones a while ago, but as I started using more and more online services I thought it was time getting one. As I am still on my old contract (for another 7 months) I decided to get the cheapest “real” smartphone money can buy contract free. After some research I decided to get the above mentioned Samsung device, the Galaxy 5. It has Android 2.1 (I did not take anything below that version into consideration) and Samsung is one of the big smartphone manufactures of today. What I am missing is multi-touch, high-res screen, high-res camera and a camera flash. I can live with that for the time being. Apart from that this small toy is a full featured smartphone that runs all Android software as your big smartphones do. It even has GPS, but I didn’t get it to work yet “Your current location is temporarily unavailable” … found a fix … WTF?

Anyway, I am pretty happy with my entry level smartphone. I am linked to my Google Mail account, Twitter, Facebook, have kewl Apps like Shazam, ConnectBot or Wifi Analyzer and can waste some time playing Angry Birds. :mrgreen:

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Game frustration. How did that ever happen?

Thursday, November 25th, 2010 | Games, Reviews | 2 Comments

Are you a gamer, too? Did you ever freak out because some part of a game was too hard to conquer? That’s pretty much normal in my opinion and it’s a good thing, a game should be challenging to some degree after all.

But then there are the games that are unfittingly hard. Or do not go along with the rest of the gameplay and plainly annoy you. Scenes that make you think WTF? Have the developers ever played this part themselves? Games that make you stop playing, maybe after hitting a hole in the wall throwing away your controller in frustration or barking at your partner. This is what I would call game frustration that should never happen. But it does. Here are a few of my game frustrations:

God of War – Rotating blade pillars

Let me recite Sean Gandert’s Review of GoW:

Ultimately, only one section of God of War seems sloppily executed and tends to slow down for players, even upon multiple replays. During Kratos’ short sojourn in the underworld, he eventually finds himself face to face with spinning pillars lined with rotating blades. Your goal is simply to climb to the top of these pillars, which wouldn’t be frustrating if not for the fact that not only does a single touch from a blade knock you back to the beginning (leaving you quite battered to boot), the pillars are also really tall. It’s a tedious affair that not only feels irrelevant to the rest of the game—even by the most lenient use of the term, it doesn’t begin to qualify as a puzzle—but which also truly adds nothing to the game experience.

Most noteworthy of all is that in a game which emphasizes the importance of speed and spectacle, this particular section requires a great deal of patience and repetition. The 15-20 minutes most people spend here in this section aren’t actually that much, but when the average time for most rooms in the game is two minutes or fewer, it brings the game’s otherwise exceptional pacing to a halt. Unsurprisingly, it was also the only section of the entire game that wasn’t playtested. With the recent re-release of the game on PS3, it was even commemorated with the only gold trophy awarded for a specific challenge, since going past these spiked columns without being hit really is on par with beating the game in under five hours.

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Windows 7 ClearType WTF?

Sunday, March 28th, 2010 | IDE, Misc, Tech-savvy | 2 Comments

I recently had to switch to Windoze 7. I am not the kind of guy who likes migrating to new OSs – the biggest challenge was the switch from an all tuned Win98 SE to Windows XP almost a decade ago. Well, times change, and I don’t have to be on a first name basis with every file on my system partition any more. Things should just run, stable, fast and smart (oh, it does all that by itself?). Something that Linux Mint does for me every time I need a free OS for a random project (HTPC, friend’s netbook, arcade emulation machine, you name it). Windows 7 has been a great piece of software so far, it’s as fast as XP, has a good look and feel and does smart things like getting drivers from M$ so I don’t have to dl them from third party websites (btw: Dell, I pretty much hate you for your “support” section… it’s such a mess!).

All right, back to topic. I want to share some experience I gathered with Microsoft ClearType technology. This is a short description taken from Wikipedia:

ClearType is a trademark for Microsoft‘s implementation of subpixel rendering technology. ClearType attempts to improve the appearance of text on certain types of computer display screens by sacrificing color fidelity for additional intensity variation. This trade-off is asserted to work well on LCD flat panel monitors.

With ClearType enabled I have the constant feeling that my display has a focus problem. I’m really into pixels 😉 and I want to see ’em, not some blurry optimized mud. I understand the need for soft-focused cutting/editing using image manipulation software like Photoshop or Gimp, but fonts should be plain (black) pixels on plain (white) background. This is just my opinion, others may like the new style better.  I also agree that ClearType makes sense on a certain display size / resolution / dpi ratio, say a 20″ full-hd display with 120 DPI could be a good choice for subpixel rendering. I prefer the old style ratios like 20″ 1680×1050 75 DPI or 24″ full-hd 75 DPI.

Anyway, here are some examples of bad “optimization” and how I got rid of them, well, almost.

The first program that hurt my eyes was the eclipse IDE. Being a software developer I work with the eclipse workbench on a daily basis. What I did was copy my eclipse workspaces from my old XP box to the new machine. (Something I really like about development tools (eclipse, Java, MySQL, JBoss, …) – they don’t have to be installed, just unzip/copy ’em and you are ready to go. )

I launched eclipse and something felt different. I blinked my eyes. Still, something odd was displayed on my screen. I thought “OMG, ClearType”, so I disabled this feature as I did every time before I ever came across it (mostly Internet Explorer). The font rendering in the text editor was fine now, but suddenly the explorer tree looked horrible. See for yourself (click to enlarge, browse the enlarged pictures to see the difference):

I was stuck with either a nice representation of the explorer tree or a feel good editor. This sucked big time! But I found a solution to this problem, which included the enabling of the ClearType feature. Yikes! After fiddling with eclipse’s font settings I found the bugger! “Courier New” (the font I had used for source code for years) is getting rendered blurry, “Courier” doesn’t (@see font dialogue on the right hand side).

Switching from “Courier New” to “Courier” solved the rendering issue, but I did not like the line-height of “Courier”, the code seemed to be squeezed together, but this is another issue 🙂

The rendering “bug” was found and “Courier New” is history to me – today I use “Segoe UI” and I am pretty fond of the font. (Plz forgive me for that bad joke, it was just too tempting… 🙂 )

Conclusion: What I find annoying about the font rendering settings is the fact, that you cannot choose between an old sk00l font rendering style and the new ClearType way, meaning 1:1 pixels vs. subpixel rendering. You can only choose between bad (ClearType on) and worse (ClearType off) font rendering using Windows 7. While I am typing this my eyes really feel stressed reading on my Win7 machine and it’s always a pleasure to go back to my private ole WinXP desktop. *Sigh* It seems to me M$ foobared the non-ClearType rendering that bad you just have to use ClearType. So they can say: “Look, it all looks better with ClearType”. Yeah, right!

But M$ does not have to dictate how fonts are getting rendered. Software can give you the opportunity to choose the font rendering style. Read on for a good example on how a piece of software lets you choose how fonts are displayed.

Another tool I use on a regular basis is PuTTY. Again, “Courier New” used to be my weapon of choice for shells and as soon as I started using PuTTY on Windows 7 with ClearType enabled my eyes were screaming “Focus! Fooocus!” – I opened the font preferences dialogue and found some pretty interesting settings.

PuTTY gives you the opportunity to choose a font “quality” from Antialiased, Non-Antialiased, ClearType and Default. Default is enabled by, well yes, default, which is ClearType on systems that have ClearType enabled. I simply chose Non-Antialiased and all my font problems were solved. I can stick to “Courier New” with a proper line-heigt (in contrast to “Courier”) and crisp font rendering. Finully! Now I just have to wait for other tool developers to offer similar options to end users or the world falling into subpixel rendering apathy. Either way, until 200+DPI displays are released to the open public I will miss the good ole “a pixel is just a pixel” days and try to eliminate bad display “optimization”.

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